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Verde River Field Seminar


The Verde River is a major tributary of the Salt River that runs through Phoenix. It is one of the largest perennial streams in Arizona. The Verde provides habitat for a diverse array of wildlife species and contains some of the most important riparian and associated upland habitat found in Arizona and the Southwest. Little wonder that ancient cultures were drawn to this important source of water and wildlife to build major dwellings. 

NOTE: Hiking to the top of the Hatalacva Dwelling is very strenuous with a significant elevation change in a short amount of time. This hike is NOT recommended for anyone with any physical limitations (knee replacement, etc.) or breathing problems.

The first stop will be the Tuzigoot National Monument. Tuzigoot was first occupied about A.D. 1000. The pueblo grew to be one of the largest known hamlets on the Verde River by A.D. 1350. Prior to abandonment, Tuzigoot pueblo contained between 90 and 100 contemporaneous rooms. Perhaps 225 people were living in the pueblo at that time. Just across the river, the 20-room Tuzigoot extension was occupied by perhaps another 45 people.




The second stop will be Hatalacva, an Archaeological Conservancy preserve. Hatalacva consists of a large pueblo covering an area 110 m by 50 m. The pueblo is constructed of coursed masonry walls of undraped limestone, sandstone, and basalt boulders and blocks. Exposed walls as high as five feet  are heavily plastered with adobe mortar. The site consists mainly of mounds of wall fall rubble.   





START: The Seminar starts at 8:30 am in the Archaeology Center for an overview - leaving the Center promptly at 9:00.

LENGTH: 3-4 hours

PRICE: $125 per person includes transportation from the Center, water and Monument admission fee. Members and their guests receive a 15% discount.

GROUP SIZE: We can schedule a field seminar with a minimum of 3 participants and maximum of 6. A private tour can be arranged with pick-up at your location when paying for six participants.

DIFFICULTY: The hike to Hatalacva is difficult and involves an elevation change, with uneven terrain. As a result, we cannot accommodate children under 12.

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Additional information on the seminars, such as required clothing and supplies, can be found in the Details page.