Fine Art

The Verde Valley Archaeology Center (VVAC) seeks to enhance its collections by adding, in a judicious manner, those objects that are appropriate to the VVAC mission, officially adopted by the Board of Directors. All donated artwork must support the organization’s mission to foster a deep understanding of prehistory and American Indian history in the Verde Valley through the science of archaeology.

Works of art, objects, photographs and archival materials are accepted when certain criteria are met:

  1. The artwork or objects are relevant to and consistent with the purposes and activities of the VVAC as stated in the mission (exhibits, research, and/or educational programs).

  2. The VVAC must be able to provide for the storage, protection, and preservation of artwork or objects under conditions that ensure their availability for VVAC’s purpose and in keeping with accepted professional standards.

  3. The artwork or objects are in reasonably good physical condition or can be conserved with VVAC’s resources.

Art for donation are not accepted unless arrangements have been made in advance with VVAC staff. All donations are considered outright and unconditional gifts to be used at the discretion of the VVAC. If you have art that you would like to donate, please read the VVAC's Artwork Donation Policy.  At present, the Verde Valley Archaeology Center has a small collection of fine art with plans to expand the collection after completion of the new Archaeology Campus. Below are the main pieces currently in the collection. 

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Black Range Verde Valley

Paul Dyck (1917-2006)

1988
30 x 40 Sumi-e on board

Gift of the Paul Dyck Foundation

© Verde Valley Archaeology Center. All rights reserved.

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Deer Hunter Dancer

Paul Dyck (1917-2006)

1980
40 x 30 Sumi-e on board

Gift of the Paul Dyck Foundation

© Verde Valley Archaeology Center. All rights reserved.

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Meeting Place

Earl Carpenter (1931-   )

1980
40 x 30 Oil on Canvas

Gift of the Earl and Millie Carpenter

© Verde Valley Archaeology Center. All rights reserved.

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Toroweap Green – Short Creek

Paul Dyck (1917-2006)

1988
30 x 40 Sumi-e on board

Gift of the Paul Dyck Foundation

© Verde Valley Archaeology Center. All rights reserved.

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Montezuma Castle

Santos Zingale (1908-1999)

1978
54 x 46 Oil on canvas

Gift of 

© Verde Valley Archaeology Center. All rights reserved.

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Deer Hunter Dancer

Filmer Kewanyama (1959 -  )

1980
16 x 20 Oil on canvas

Gift of the Ken and Nancy Zoll

© Verde Valley Archaeology Center. All rights reserved.

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Sikyatki-style Ceramic Jar

Michael Peter Hawley (1948 - 2012)

1980
14 x 7 

Gift of the Todd and Heidi Bostwick

© Verde Valley Archaeology Center. All rights reserved.

Paul Dyck (1917-2006) was born in Chicago. His family was originally from Europe but lived in Alberta, Canada; Chicago, Illinois; and St. Paul, Minnesota. While in southern Alberta, the family lived with the Blackfoot Tribe and Paul’s father collected Plains Indian crafts, which began Paul’s life-long interest in the Plains Indian culture. Paul’s family returned to Europe in 1921, and it was decided that Paul was to train to be an artist. He was sent at age 12 to apprentice with his Uncle Johann van Skramlick, a well-known European portrait painter. At 15 he trained at the Munich Academy. In 1935, Paul began to travel through the west for the next several years, returning to the East in winter to do freelance illustration work. Paul settled in Rimrock in the Verde Valley in 1938. He purchased a 312-acre ranch that had fallen into disrepair. In 1953, he took up painting as a full-time career. He largely painted on board in the Old Master tradition or utilized the Japanese Sumi-e ink techniques, but he also worked with acrylics. Paul became well-known as a painter and ultimately he had 65 one-man exhibitions all over the country, including New York, Chicago, Los Angeles, and Tucson. His paintings are included in the collection of the Phoenix Art Museum, the Museum of Northern Arizona, and the Tucson Museum of Art.

 

Santos Zingale (1908-1999) was an American artist born in Wisconsin in 1908 into a Sicilian family. He worked for the Public Works of Art Project (PWAP) in 1933–1934. The PWAP was a program to employ artists, as part of the New Deal during the Great Depression. and was commissioned to paint large-scale murals in public buildings for the Works Progress Administration. In 1943, he was awarded a Master’s degree for his mural, Democracy in Education, at the University of Wisconsin–Madison’s School of Education. When WWII came about, he served in the Navy from 1944 to 1946, all the while making sketches from life upon the USS Bremerton. After his discharge, he was given the status of Emeritus Professor at UW-Madison where he taught until his retirement in 1978.

Earl Carpenter (1931-    ) was born in Southern California. He is best known for his panoramic scenes of the Grand Canyon and other northern Arizona landmarks. He started painting while in the U.S. Air Force. After his service, he enrolled in the Art Center College of Design (Pasadena) and later the Chouinard Art Institute (Los Angeles). This led to illustrating in the aerospace industry. In 1960, Earl and his wife Millie "set out to explore the country." They made it "all the way to Arizona" before deciding to settle in Sedona where he owned an art gallery. The couple eventually moved to Phoenix where Earl found work as a technical illustrator. By the 1970's Carpenter decided to become a full-time artist. He moved to Flagstaff and spent extensive time on the Hopi and Navajo reservations. He began to focus on inspirational subjects such as the Grand Canyon, Lake Powell, Grand Tetons and Yellowstone. He paints studies of his favorite subjects, then returns to his studio to create the larger works. Carpenter works with a limited range of colors, using three primary tones in combination with seven secondary colors, a style he says resembles the palettes preferred by turn-of-the-century luminist painters. His work is include in many publications and collections and has appeared in articles in Arizona Highways, Art of the West, Art-Talk and U.S. Art. His works are also included in the book The Majesty of the Grand Canyon: 150 Years in Art.

Filmer Kewanyama (1959 -      ) Filmer's lineage is descended from the Hopi Tribe of the Southwest. He is a U.S. Army veteran of 21 years. and began to paint after his service. The majority of his work depicts and chronicles the Hopi way of life, what he feels and knows is very important, and sacred to him. Hopi are of the few Native American people that cling to the old way of life and its ceremonies. As a child growing up on Hopi, he too learned through Hopi initiations the ceremonies that their ancestors passed on. The usage of symbols, and what he calls Katsina colors is crucial to his work. His influences come from what he knows of Hopi history and what are his own interpretations of Hopi history fueled by his personal feelings. He is constantly striving to learn and develop new techniques and ideas to use in his paintings, digital art, sculpture, and much more. Some of his other works have to do with his personal experiences of growing up between American culture and his Native culture. He focuses on trying to depict the spirituality of what Hopi means to him "The People of Peace." His goal is to educate Non-Hopi on who they are, and to continue to grow spirituality and professionally as an artist.

Michael Hawley (1948-2012), formerly of Scottsdale, Arizona, was the only contemporary potter creating true Sikyatki Polychrome pottery vessels in the same manner as they were originally made from the 14th through the 17th centuries. Hawley called this pottery "Chakoptewa Polychrome," Chakoptewa being his adopted Hopi name. Hawley used only hand-ground clay dug on Antelope Mesa on the Hopi Reservation and he hand coiled, shaped, polished, painted and coal fired each of the pots in a firing pit he constructed himself. All of his pigments were made by hand from minerals and plants indigenous to the Hopi Mesas and each of his painted designs is original and within the Sikyatki designs tradition. Hawley's pieces are original and unique pieces of contemporary ceramic art inspired by ancient tradition.