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Event Calendar

Upcoming events

    • 02 Mar 2019
    • 10:00 AM - 4:00 PM
    • Verde Valley Archaeology Center

    The Arizona Site Steward program was developed by Governor Bruce Babbitt and his Archaeological Advisory Commission in an attempt to support the protection of cultural sites on public lands. Starting with three and four partners, the program has grown to encompass the entire state and 32 local, state, federal and non-profit partners. The program is currently administered by Arizona State Parks.

    The Arizona Site Stewards Program is an organization of volunteers, sponsored by the public land managers of Arizona, whose members are selected, trained and certified by the State Historic Preservation Office and the Governor's Archaeology Advisory Commission.The chief objective of the Stewards Program is to report to the land managers destruction or vandalism of prehistoric and historic archaeological and paleontological sites in Arizona through site monitoring. Stewards are also active in public education and outreach activities.

    The Verde Valley Archaeology Center acts as the Regional Coordinator for the site stewards within the Sedona/Verde Valley area. There is always a need for more volunteers to monitor our cultural sites. This open house will provide an opportunity to learn about the program and perhaps volunteer as a site steward.

    • 03 Mar 2019
    • 9:30 AM - 3:00 PM
    • Tonto National Forest
    • 8
    Register

    This is a MEMBERS ONLY carpool trip limited to 15. A WaitList is available if this excursion fills up.

    Hundreds of once-thriving communities lived in the Tonto Basin area of the Upper Sonoran Desert. Two are at this site, each tailored to fit the alcove they called home—the Lower Dwelling with 14 rooms and the Upper Dwelling with 40 rooms. Both existed at the same time, from about 1300 to 1450 CE.

    These well-preserved cliff dwellings hosted Hohokam, Mogollon and Ancestral Puebloan styles in a mixed-cultural phenomenon known as the Salado Culture. These were farming people, with irrigation canals visible until the flooding of Roosevelt Lake. They left a legacy of beautiful artifacts. The site was designated a national monument in 1907 by President Theodore Roosevelt, and expanded by Franklin Roosevelt to include nearly 70 archaeological sites on a 1120 acre preserve.

    The Tonto National Monument Visitor Center and Museum offer an introduction to and film about the Salado Culture. You can visit this before or after the hike to the cliff dwellings. We have reserved time with the Ranger for a visit the Upper Cliff dwelling, accessible only with a ranger guide.

    The Upper Cliff Dwelling's many rooms showcase partially intact roofs, an ancient spring, and unique architectural features. The tour takes about 4 hours, and is a 3-mile round trip with a steeply graded 600 foot elevation gain. The trail is not handicap-accessible.

    Meet no later than 9:30 at the Tonto National Monument Visitor Center. The Ranger will begin the hike to the cliff dwellings PROMPTLY at 10:00 am.

    Directions: From Payson, go about 20 miles south on the Beeline Highway/Highway 87 to State Route 188. Turn onto Route 188, and continue past the Roosevelt Dam Bridge, 39 miles to the monument on the right. It’s about 52 miles from Payson. Bring lunch, water/fluids, good shoes, hats, sunscreen, walking sticks. Total estimated driving time from Camp Verde to the Monument is two hours.

    NOTE: There is an admission fee for the Tonto National Monument that is NOT included in the excursion fee since many have Senior or National Park passes. Without a pass the fee is $10 per person, but four can enter for FREE with a person with a National Park Pass.

    There is a picnic area at the Monument. Bring lunch, water/fluids, good shoes, hats, sunscreen, walking sticks.

    • 05 Mar 2019
    • 6:30 PM - 8:00 PM
    • Camp Verde Community Library, 130 Black Bridge Loop Rd.

    An Arizona Archaeological and Heritage Awareness Month Event

    It has been thought that the Apache do not become Apache until the adoption of the horse, which triggered the raiding adaptation. Dr. Deni Seymour will present an Arizona Humanities AZ Speaks talk to explain that while horses played a central role in the Apachean world, the horse divide is not as pronounced as thought. Horses changed the ancestral Apache lifeway and horses survived and thrived without European horse culture. Horses shaped warfare and intercultural relations, were intertwined with family and inter-band relations, and were integrated into Apachean lives through use of horse power and in ceremonies. The horse is maintained in contemporary culture and archaeological traces document the historical role of horses in rock art, bones, landscape use, and artifacts.

    Dr. Seymour is an internationally recognized authority on protohistoric, Native American, and Spanish colonial archaeology and ethno-history. For 30 years, she has studied the Apache, Sobaipuri O’odham, and lesser-known mobile groups. She has excavated Spanish presidios, numerous Kino-period missions, and several indigenous sites. She works with indigenous groups, tackles the Coronado and Niza expeditions, and is reworking the history of the pre-Spanish and colonial period of the Southwest.

    All lectures are free to the public.

    • 07 Mar 2019
    • 6:30 PM - 8:00 PM
    • Camp Verde Community Library, 130 Black Bridge Loop Rd.

    An Arizona Archaeology and Heritage Awareness Month Event

    Secrets of the Nolichucky River (USA, 58 min.)

    Cane Notch, an archaeological site nestled alongside the scenic Nolichucky River of North Carolina and Tennessee, may hold the key to a missing link in Cherokee history. Join explorers from East Tennessee State University, using modern-day technology to see beneath the land’s surface, as they uncover a Native American village in Upper East Tennessee. The perfectly preserved Cherokee village has been dubbed “a mini-Pompeii” by archaeological experts. Follow the team’s progress as it discovers ancient artifacts and unlocks the Secrets of the Nolichucky River.

    All films at the Camp Verde Community Library are free and open to the public.



    • 11 Mar 2019
    • 9:00 AM - 12:00 PM
    • VVAC Learning Center
    • 9
    Register

    An Arizona Archaeological and Heritage Awareness Month Event

    This class will provide a basic overview of the archaeology in the Southwest with emphasis on the Sedona/Verde Valley area. It will incorporate discussion of cultural sequences, dating systems, subsistence strategies, material culture, abandonment and the general characteristics of the major cultural groups in the Southwest.

    Executive Director Ken Zoll will conduct this class.

    The cost of the class is $45 for members and $65 for nonmembers. The fee includes class materials.

    • 12 Mar 2019
    • 8:00 AM
    • 13 Mar 2019
    • 12:00 PM
    • Verde Valley Archaeology Center
    • 12
    Register

    An Arizona Archaeological and Heritage Awareness Month Event

    Join archaeologist Justin Parks to learn how to make a prehistoric Southwest style arrow. Participants of the class will construct an arrow from all natural materials using the technology available to the Sinagua Tradition of the Verde Valley. Each component of the arrow will match characteristics of Sinagua artifacts housed in the Verde Valley Archaeology Center. Students of the class will receive a private viewing of the arrow components housed in the museum, before being guided through the construction process to make their own replica. Students of the class will leave with a fully functional arrow built by hand> with the same materials and methods used in the ancient Southwest. Students of the class will also acquire a greater understanding of the intricate details of how and why prehistoric arrows were made the way they were.

    Arrow Making Lesson Plan

    • 5% refunded if signed-up for companion flint-knapping class
    • Minimum class size 6; Maximum class size 12
    • Total class time 8 hours
    • Coffee and snacks provided

    Tuesday

    • 8-9 am Museum and Archive Tour (coffee available 7:45 am)
    • 9-10 am Correct shaft length and straightening, nock plugs
    • 10-11 am Foreshaft carving
    • 11 am-12 pm Arrow paint preparation

    Wednesday

    • 8-9 am Foreshaft carving continued
    • 9-10 am Fletching- cutting feathers and applying sinew
    • 10-11 am Pine pitch glue- recipe and process
    • 11 am-12 pm open work time

    In-class materials provided

    • Reed arrow shafts
    • Hardwood shoots for foreshafts
    • Sinew
    • Turkey feathers
    • Piñon sap and gum
    • Woodworking tools
    • Arrow Paint


    • 12 Mar 2019
    • 6:30 PM - 8:00 PM
    • Camp Verde Community Library, 130 Black Bridge Loop Rd.

    An Arizona Archaeological and Heritage Awareness Month Event

    Dr. Todd Bostwick will present "A New View on the Ancient Sinagua: Analysis of the Dyck Cliff Dwelling Collection." 

    Excavated  between 1962 and 1972, the large quantity of archaeological materials recovered from the Dyck Cliff Dwelling, located northeast of Montezuma Castle, were kept in storage for more than 40 years until they were donated to the Verde Valley Archaeology Center in 2014. Detailed analysis of the well-preserved wooden artifacts, colorful textiles, diverse ceramics, and remarkable food remains has provided new information about the prehistoric cliff dwellers who lived in the Verde Valley.

    Dr. Todd Bostwick is the Director of Archaeology for the Verde Valley Archaeology Center and Museum. 

    This is a free lecture open to the public.

    • 14 Mar 2019
    • 8:00 AM - 2:00 PM
    • Verde Valley Archaeology Center
    • 12
    Register

    An Arizona Archaeological and Heritage Awareness Month Event

     Join archaeologist Justin Parks to learn how to make stone arrow points like those used in the prehistoric Verde Valley. Participants will learn how to detach obsidian flakes for arrowheads and pressure flake the point to shape. The class will use local Arizona stone available to the Sinagua Tradition of the Verde Valley. Students will leave the class with a reconstructed stone projectile point. Students will also acquire an in-depth understanding of the process it takes to make a stone projectile point from a detailed look at original artifacts in the Verde Valley Archaeology Center.

    • Minimum class size 6 -  Maximum class size 12
    • Class time 6 hours (8 am-2 pm) 1 hour brunch at 11 am
    • Coffee and Brunch Provided

    In-Class Materials Provided

    • Obsidian flakes suitable for creating arrowheads
    • 1 large basalt nodule per person
    • Pressure flakers
    • Leather pads
    • Goggles
    • Abraders

    Lesson Plan Schedule

    Percussion Flaking

    8-9 am - How to produce suitable obsidian flakes for arrowheads

    Pressure Flaking

    9-10 am - How to set up platforms and apply force

    10-11 am - How to shape obsidian and maintain a sharp edge

    11 am-12 pm - Brunch

    12-1 pm - How to serrate and notch

    1-2 pm - Museum tour. Looking at arrow points in a new light


    • 14 Mar 2019
    • 6:30 PM - 8:00 PM
    • Camp Verde Community Library, 130 Black Bridge Loop Rd.

    An Arizona Archaeology and Heritage Awareness Month Event

    Impact of the Frolic
      (Advanced Lab for Visual Anthropology, 24 min.)
    In the summer of 1984, archaeologist Thomas Layton unearthed some unexpected Chinese artifacts at a Native American site in Mendocino County, California. Driven to discover their origins, Dr. Layton set out on a quest to solve the riddle of the mysterious potsherd. These potsherds had been recovered from a cargo of Chinese porcelain spilled from a Gold Rush shipwreck. How these altered the perception of Chinese immigration into the United States and its impact on both sides is the subject of this film. What he eventually uncovered was the story of vast cultural connections and a shipwreck that impacted California forever.

    Chartres: Light Reborn (France, 52 min.)
    Chartres Cathedral, an icon of French Gothic architecture, underwent restoration between June 2014 and October 2016 of the nave, the stained-glass windows on each side, and the first statues in the ambulatory. Anne Savalli’s 2016 documentary Chartres: Light Reborn tells the story of the restorers, archaeologists, scientists, and architects who worked to complete this vast project.

    All films at the Camp Verde Community Library are free and open to the public.

    • 16 Mar 2019
    • 8:00 AM
    • 17 Mar 2019
    • 12:00 PM
    • Verde Valley Archaeology Center
    • 8
    Register

    An Arizona Archaeological and Heritage Awareness Month Event

    Join archaeologist Justin Parks to learn how to make a prehistoric style wooden bow similar to bows recovered from the Verde Valley used by the Sinagua. Participants will learn how to carve and properly bend a suitable hardwood into a fully functional bow. The class will use local hardwood saplings of the correct species and size to the original artifacts. Students will leave the class with a reconstructed bow capable of launching an arrow. Students will also acquire an in-depth understanding of southwestern archery from a detailed look at original artifacts in the Verde Valley Archaeology Center.

    • 5% refund if signed-up for companion flint-knapping class
    • Minimum class size 4; Maximum class size 8
    • Total class time 8 hours
    • Coffee and snacks provided

    Saturday

    • 8 - 9 am Museum and Archive Tour (coffee available 7:45am)
    • 9 - 10 am Reducing to final dimensions
    • 11-12 pm Begin floor tillering

    Sunday

    • 8 am-12 pm floor tillering and final tillering
    • 12 pm Sanding and target practice!

    In-class materials provided

    • Oak saplings
    • Bowstrings
    • Sinew
    • All woodworking tools
    • 18 Mar 2019
    • 9:00 AM - 12:00 PM
    • VVAC Learning Center
    • 10
    Register

    An Arizona Archaeology and Heritage Awareness Month Event

    This class will provide a basic overview of prehistoric astronomical practices in the Southwest with emphasis on the Sedona/Verde Valley area. This class will review the current literature on archaeoastronomy and discuss important issues relating to the naked eye observation of celestial objects in the night sky. This class will sample a small portion of a large body of literature on archaeoastronomy. Mesoamerican archaeoastronomy will be included because of the influence of Mesoamerican cultures on the Southwest .

    The instructor will be Executive Director, Ken Zoll, author of several books on the Sinagua Sunwatchers of the Verde Valley.

    The cost of the class is $45 for members and $65 for nonmembers. The fee includes class materials.

    • 19 Mar 2019
    • 6:30 PM - 8:00 PM
    • Camp Verde Community Library, 130 Black Bridge Loop Rd.

    An Arizona Archaeology and Heritage Awareness Month Event

    National Park Service staff, Matt Guebard, Lucas Hoedl and Wendel Navenma, will talk about recent attempts to study the architecture at Montezuma Castle. This includes investigations of the building techniques and materials used to construct the cliff dwelling. Additionally, the presentation will discuss attempts to build a "replicate room" using local materials and traditional construction methods similar to those used at Montezuma Castle. By replicating these ancient building styles, the park has acquired valuable insight into the labor required to build a cliff dwelling and the potential environmental impact caused by collecting local building materials. This presentation will highlight how the in-depth study of ancient architecture can produce important information about the lives and experiences of past people. 

    This is a free lecture open to the public. 

    • 21 Mar 2019
    • 9:00 AM - 3:00 PM
    • Hopi - Second Mesa
    • 0
    Join waitlist

    This is a MEMBERS ONLY carpool trip limited to 14 individuals.

    Join Bertram Tsavadawa, artist and Certified Hopi Guide, for this unique six-hour adventure to Hopiland.

    • Dawa Park: With Bertram’s expertise, we will see some of the ancient Hopi solar calendar petroglyphs at the Dawa Park site, in addition to learning about some of the many other images pecked into the rock patina. Dawa Park is a source of 12,000 to 15,000 petroglyphs dating back to the Hopi’s ancestral relatives.

    This trip is timed to witness the light & shadow appearance on the Dawa Park rock face at mid-morning of the Vernal Equinox.

    • Coal Mine Canyon: We will visit this place of stunning and colorful sandstone hoodoos, spires, gullies and cliffs deposited by the Entrada Formation during the Jurassic Period 180 to 140 million years ago. A photographer’s dream site! This canyon overlook is about 40 miles west of Third Mesa, the site of a vast inland sea.
    • Old Oraibi: We will also walk Old Oraibi, one of oldest continuously inhabited villages in North America. Bertram will teach us about the history of the place, including his family home, and stories of the Hopi People.

    We will meet in front of the Hopi restaurant on Second Mesa at 9 AM. We will leave PROMPTLY at 9:30 so we strongly suggest staying in an area motel the night before. Here are three recommendations:

    • 21 Mar 2019
    • 6:30 PM - 8:00 PM
    • Camp Verde Community Library, 130 Black Bridge Loop Rd.

    An Arizona Archaeology and Heritage Awareness Month Event

    Torn
       (Advanced Laboratory for Visual Anthropology, Cal State Univ, 27 min)
    For thousands of years, stunning petroglyphs on the volcanic tablelands near Bishop, California shimmered in the starlight, but then a menace struck. Looters with rock saws and chisels destroyed this ancient site leaving everyone with one question...why?



    A Walk Through Time
       (Advanced Laboratory for Visual Anthropology, Cal State Univ, 28 min)
    With its majestic landscapes, diverse wildlife, and a history spanning 14,000 years, Anderson Marsh State Historic Park is one of the most unique places in all of California. It is also the home of the Koi people who were the first humans to colonize the area and who are still there to this day. Their deep cultural heritage prompted the extraordinary events that led to the park's creation and reinforces the current struggles to protect the amazing resources that the park holds.

    All films at the Camp Verde Community Library are free and open to the public.


    • 22 Mar 2019
    • 9:00 AM - 3:00 PM
    • Hopi - Second Mesa
    • 0
    Join waitlist

    This is a MEMBERS ONLY carpool trip limited to 14 individuals.

    Join Bertram Tsavadawa, artist and Certified Hopi Guide, for this unique six-hour adventure to Hopiland.

    • Dawa Park: With Bertram’s expertise, we will see some of the ancient Hopi solar calendar petroglyphs at the Dawa Park site, in addition to learning about some of the many other images pecked into the rock patina. Dawa Park is a source of 12,000 to 15,000 petroglyphs dating back to the Hopi’s ancestral relatives.

    This trip is timed to witness the light & shadow appearance on the Dawa Park rock face at mid-morning of the Vernal Equinox.

    • Coal Mine Canyon: We will visit this place of stunning and colorful sandstone hoodoos, spires, gullies and cliffs deposited by the Entrada Formation during the Jurassic Period 180 to 140 million years ago. A photographer’s dream site! This canyon overlook is about 40 miles west of Third Mesa, the site of a vast inland sea.
    • Old Oraibi: We will also walk Old Oraibi, one of oldest continuously inhabited villages in North America. Bertram will teach us about the history of the place, including his family home, and stories of the Hopi People.

    We will meet in front of the Hopi restaurant on Second Mesa at 9 AM. We will leave PROMPTLY at 9:30 so we strongly suggest staying in an area motel the night before. Here are three recommendations:

    • 26 Mar 2019
    • 1:00 PM - 4:00 PM
    • VVAC Learning Center
    • 10
    Register

    An Arizona Archaeology and Heritage Awareness Month Event

    This seminar will explain the field of dendrochronology (tree-ring dating) with emphasis on its applications and contribution to northern and central Arizona archaeology. The seminar will consist of lectures, less than an hour in length, with demonstrations, hand-on displays, and representative artifacts.

    Specific content will include:

    • Background: The 20th century development of dendrochronology and its interdisciplinary contribution to science.
    • How we know what we know: Scientific fundamentals of data collection and cross-dating tree ring widths.
    • Archaeological applications: Survey of dendroarchaeological studies and important findings from the region.

    Nicholas Kessler is a PhD candidate in Anthropology at the University Arizona. He has been involved in archaeological field work, laboratory research, and analysis since 2006 in both cultural resource management and academic projects. His research interests are centered around the human-environment interface, natural legacies of environmental modification, archaeological reconstructions of population dynamics, and problems in archaeological chronology. Past and present research topics include: soil chemistry and tree growth in Pre-Columbian run-off irrigated fields; ecological and political models of population dynamics in the Northern Rio Grande; high resolution radiocarbon dating of tree ring series; geoarchaeology and late-Quaternary landscape evolution; and dendrochronology.

     Dr. Greg Hodgins and Nicholas Kessler will be presenting a lecture on March 26 at 6:30 in the Camp Verde Library on Dating the Construction and Use of the Montezuma Castle cliff dwelling

    • 26 Mar 2019
    • 6:30 PM - 8:00 PM
    • Camp Verde Community Library, 130 Black Bridge Loop Rd.

    An Arizona Archaeology and Heritage Awareness Month Event

    Dating the Construction and Use of the Montezuma Castle cliff dwelling by Dr. Greg Hodgins and Nicholas Kessler (University of Arizona)

    Dr. Hodgins and Mr. Kessler will discuss a recent cooperative research project between the National Park Service and the University of Arizona Accelerator Mass Spectrometry Laboratory. This project has utilized radiocarbon dating to better understand when the cliff dwelling was built and how its architecture changed over time. The presenters will discuss the methods used and preliminary results from the project. This presentation will highlight the use of cutting edge science to develop an interpretation of past events at Montezuma Castle. 

    This is a free lecture open to the public. 

    • 27 Mar 2019
    • 9:00 AM - 12:00 PM
    • VVAC Learning Center
    • 14
    Register

    An Arizona Archaeology and Heritage Awareness Month Event

    This seminar will explain the field of dendrochronology (tree-ring dating) with emphasis on its applications and contribution to northern and central Arizona archaeology. The seminar will consist of lectures, less than an hour in length, with demonstrations, hand-on displays, and representative artifacts.

    Specific content will include:

    • Background: The 20th century development of dendrochronology and its interdisciplinary contribution to science.
    • How we know what we know: Scientific fundamentals of data collection and cross-dating tree ring widths.
    • Archaeological applications: Survey of dendroarchaeological studies and important findings from the region.

    Nicholas Kessler is a PhD candidate in Anthropology at the University Arizona. He has been involved in archaeological field work, laboratory research, and analysis since 2006 in both cultural resource management and academic projects. His research interests are centered around the human-environment interface, natural legacies of environmental modification, archaeological reconstructions of population dynamics, and problems in archaeological chronology. Past and present research topics include: soil chemistry and tree growth in Pre-Columbian run-off irrigated fields; ecological and political models of population dynamics in the Northern Rio Grande; high resolution radiocarbon dating of tree ring series; geoarchaeology and late-Quaternary landscape evolution; and dendrochronology.

    • 28 Mar 2019
    • 6:30 PM - 8:00 PM
    • Camp Verde Library, 130 Black Bridge Loop Rd.

    An Arizona Archaeology and Heritage Awareness Month Event

    Stone Age Cinema (France, 52 min.)
    According to groundbreaking discoveries, our prehistoric ancestors may have invented the concept while drawing on their walls. Over the past 150 years, we have discovered many examples of amazing prehistoric art, most of which are fascinating representations of animals. Today, a new reading of these paintings and engravings has revealed the existence of numerous cases of the breakdown of movement. A horse painting from the Lascaux caves in France, for example, is made up of many versions of the animal representing different positions of movement. Director and archaeologist Marc Azema extracts these individual images and displays them in succession, demonstrating how they play back like a cartoon. This documentary takes us right back to the beginnings of man’s artistic heritage to discover these graphic narratives, in a unique investigation into the cultural DNA of humanity.

    The Camp Verde showing will be followed by a Question and Answer session with Dr. Kelley Hays-Gilpin, Professor of Anthropology at Northern Arizona University, and Curator of Anthropology at the Museum of Northern Arizona. She holds a PhD in Anthropology from the University of Arizona, and has visited some of the sites described in this film.


    • 25 Apr 2019
    • 6:30 PM - 8:00 PM
    • Oak Creek Country Club, 690 Bell Rock Blvd, Sedona (VOC)

    NOTE: This meeting will be at the Oak Creek Country Club, 690 Bell Rock Blvd, Sedona (VOC)

    People & Plants...from the Land of the Colorful Corn by Phyllis Hogan

    Phyllis Hogan is an acclaimed herbalist and ethnobotanist with over 40 years experience practicing and teaching in the American Southwest. She resides in Flagstaff, Arizona, where she founded the Winter Sun Trading Company in 1976. Since its inception, Winter Sun has provided exceptional organic botanical products, with a special emphasis on traditional southwest herbs and tinctures. Working directly with indigenous artists, she also showcases Hopi and Navajo jewelry and fine art. Immersion in the rich cultural heritage of her bioregion inspired Phyllis to co-found the Arizona Ethnobotanical Research Foundation (AERA) in 1983. The AERA is a 501(c)(3) private non-profit foundation committed to the investigation, documentation, and preservation of the traditional plant uses in Arizona and the greater Southwest.

    Phyllis has been awarded the United Plant Savers Conservation Award and the Culture Bearers of the Colorado Plateau Footways Award, and in the 1990s was the first Practitioner Associate to be recognized by the Northern Arizona Anthropology department. She has taught ethnobotany in bilingual health and educational programs for the Pima, Hualapai, Havasupai, Hopi, and Navajo tribes. When she is not busy operating her store and inspiring her community, you are apt to find Phyllis having the time of her life with her six-year-old grandson, Bodhi KaI.

    THIS LECTURE IS BEING PRESENTED AS A JOINT UNDERTAKING WITH THE VERDE VALLEY CHAPTER OF THE ARIZONA ARCHAEOLOGY SOCIETY.

    • 28 Apr 2019
    • 8:45 AM - 4:00 PM
    • Payson Area
    • 2
    Register

    This is a MEMBERS ONLY Carpool trip limited to 16. A WaitList is available if this excursion fills up.

    We will meet at 8:45 AM at the Shell Station in the Home Depot lot, 2010 N Beeline Hwy/Route 87 in Payson. The first Stop is only 15 minutes from Home Depot.

    Stop 1. Goat Camp Ruins—An active dig in Payson
    Archaeologist J. Scott Wood and volunteers from the Rim Country Chapter of the Arizona Archaeological Society have been excavating a portion of this six acre site for the past several years. Scott Wood will be there to explain and answer questions. Originally a Hohokam colony, this site was occupied continuously from around 750 to 1280 CE, into the Northern Salado Period. Now owned by the city of Payson, it will serve as an archaeological interpretive site once the excavations are complete, with hiking trails within the complex. Scott will talk about his finds in this fascinating place. Site is an easy access from Tyler Parkway, a short easy walk from the road up to the ruin.

    Stop 2. 13 Turtles--Pictograph at Flowing Springs
    There are six white pictograph panels on the vertical walls and ceiling of the grotto, in a shallow rock shelter overlooking the East Verde River. The 13 turtles painting, the most striking of the pictographs, is located high on the ceiling. Possibly a lunar calendar, but it has never been investigated. Easy access from Flowing Springs Road, with a slight walk uphill to the overhang.

    Optional Stop 3. Buckhead Mesa Petroglyphs - Above the Tonto Bridge State Park
    Those who still have energy can continue on to see these petroglyphs. On a high ridge with a view of the western sky, there are numerous petroglyphs on scattered boulders within this protected site. One location has a curious placement of concentric circles, likely to be a solar calendar. Access is via a dirt road off the Tonto Bridge road, with about a mile walk of a slight incline over many small ankle-breaker basalt rocks. Bring poles, water, hat etc. for your safety and comfort.


    After the outing, for those interested, we will gather for dinner at the Old County Inn, 3502 N Hwy 87, in Pine, a destination restaurant, renown for its wood-fired pizzas and local brews.

    • 16 Aug 2019
    • 19 Aug 2019
    • Cortez, Colorado
    • 6
    Register

    The Center will hold two excavation field schools near Cortez, Colorado at Champagne Springs site. The 2019 dates are August 16-19 and August 23-26.

    The Member cost to attend one session is $195.

    The Non-member cost to attend the first session is $245, which includes a one-year membership. The cost to attend a second is $195, since membership was purchased with the first session. Wait until your membership is processed before registering for the second session.

    To reserve your space/spaces you must register and pay your fee at the time of registration. There is a $75 non-refundable cancellation fee.

    No experience is necessary. You will be paired with someone with experience. All materials will be supplied, unless you have your own that you would like to bring. You should be in good health as the activity is mildly strenuous. The weather can be hot, in the high 80's, so appropriate clothing, sunscreen, a hat and plenty of water is a must.

    For additional information, contact Linda Guarino at lguarino@tamu.edu. 

    • 23 Aug 2019
    • 26 Aug 2019
    • Cortez, Colorado
    • 7
    Register

    The Center will hold two excavation field schools near Cortez, Colorado at Champagne Springs site. The 2019 dates are August 16-19 and August 23-26. 

    The Member cost to attend one session is $195.

    The Non-member cost to attend the first session is $245, which includes a one-year . 

    To reserve your space/spaces you must register and pay your fee at the time of registration. There is a $75 non-refundable cancellation fee.

    No experience is necessary. You will be paired with someone with experience. All materials will be supplied, unless you have your own that you would like to bring. You should be in good health as the activity is mildly strenuous. The weather can be hot, in the high 80's, so appropriate clothing, sunscreen, a hat and plenty of water is a must.

    For additional information, contact Linda Guarino at lguarino@tamu.edu.