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Event Calendar

Upcoming events

    • 01 Jul 2016
    • 6:30 PM - 8:00 PM
    • Archaeology Center, 385 S. Main St., Camp Verde

    The next film in this summer's free Archaeology Film Fest is Killer Whale and Crocodile. Carvers from two of the world's great carving traditions come together. A First Nations carver from Canada travels into the jungles of Papua New Guinea and a New Guinea carver travels to urban Canada. Together, they share each other's cultures and learn about the myths and legends that inform their individual artistic styles.

    All Summer Archaeology Film Fest films are free. Doors open at 6:00 pm. Limited seating. No reservations. All films are about one hour.

    • 08 Jul 2016
    • 6:30 PM - 8:00 PM
    • Sedona Public Library, 3250 White Bear Road

    The next film in this summer's free Archaeology Film Fest is The Sign on the Stone: The Unknown Sahara of the People With No Name. This film tells the story of how 12,000 years ago, after a period of extreme drought, the rain returned and life began to slowly sprout in the central Sahara. The first communities formed, culturally accomplished and able to define their identity not only through the mere physical survival but also to elevate their daily lives and primitive need to the complex level of pictorial expression. Through their cave paintings the shelters that gave them refuge became the place of abode and conservation of a culture.

    All Summer Archaeology Film Fest films are free. Doors open at 6:00 pm. Limited seating. No reservations. All films are about one hour.

    • 15 Jul 2016
    • 18 Jul 2016
    • Cortez, Colorado
    • 4

    The Center holds a series of excavation field schools near Cortez, Colorado at Mitchell Springs site. The 2016 dates are July 15-18, August 12-15 and August 26-29. 

    The Member cost to attend one session is $185.

    The Non-member cost to attend the first session is $235, which includes a one-year membership. The cost to attend a second or third session is $185, since membership was purchased with the first session. Wait until your membership is processed before registering for additional sessions.

    To reserve your space/spaces you must register and pay your fee at the time of registration. There is a $75 non-refundable cancellation fee.

    No experience is necessary. You will be paired with someone with experience. All materials will be supplied, unless you have your own that you would like to bring. You should be in good health as the activity is mildly strenuous. The weather can be hot, in the high 80's, so appropriate clothing, sunscreen, a hat and plenty of water is a must.

    For additional information, contact Jim Graceffa at dr.jvg@hotmail.com.

    • 15 Jul 2016
    • 6:30 PM - 8:00 PM
    • Archaeology Center, 385 S. Main St., Camp Verde

    The next film in this summer's free Archaeology Film Fest is The Sign on the Stone: The Unknown Sahara of the People With No Name. This film tells the story of how 12,000 years ago, after a period of extreme drought, the rain returned and life began to slowly sprout in the central Sahara. The first communities formed, culturally accomplished and able to define their identity not only through the mere physical survival but also to elevate their daily lives and primitive need to the complex level of pictorial expression. Through their cave paintings the shelters that gave them refuge became the place of abode and conservation of a culture.

    All Summer Archaeology Film Fest films are free. Doors open at 6:00 pm. Limited seating. No reservations. All films are about one hour.

    • 19 Jul 2016
    • 6:30 PM - 8:30 PM
    • Cliff Castle Casino Hotel

    As editor of the third edition of Fran Kosik’s classic travel book, "A Complete Motoring Guide to the Navajo and Hopi Nations," Jim Turner retraced her routes in January 2013, updating information on dozens of intriguing Native American trading posts, prehistoric ruins, museums, and natural wonders. Using the pictures taken on that trip, this presentation creates a visual travelogue of this vast beautiful and culturally unique domain.

    Before retiring from the Arizona Historical Society, Jim Turner worked with more than seventy museums in every corner of the state. He wrote the pictorial history book, Arizona: Celebration of the Grand Canyon State, is a part-time editor for Rio Nuevo Publishers, and writes articles for magazines and newspapers. Turner moved to Tucson in 1951, earned a master’s degree in U.S. history from the University of Arizona, and has been researching, writing, and teaching Arizona history for almost forty years.

    This is a free talk, open to the public.

    Cliff Castle Casino Hotel - July 19 - 6:30 pm


    • 22 Jul 2016
    • 6:30 PM - 8:00 PM
    • Sedona Public Library, 3250 White Bear Road

    The next film in this summer's free Archaeology Film Fest is Agave Is Life.  This film unveils the 10,000 year-old story of mankind's symbiotic relationship with the agave plant. Once a critical resource for survival among hunter and gatherers living in the arid regions of the American Southwest and Mexico, we learn how agave later became embedded in myth, religion, art, and culture. For these indigenous peoples, it was truly a gift from the gods. Portions were filmed in the Verde Valley.

    All Summer Archaeology Film Fest films are free. Doors open at 6:00 pm. Limited seating. No reservations. All films are about one hour.

    • 29 Jul 2016
    • 6:30 PM - 8:00 PM
    • Archaeology Center, 385 S. Main St., Camp Verde

    The next film in this summer's free Archaeology Film Fest is Agave Is Life.  This film unveils the 10,000 year-old story of mankind's symbiotic relationship with the agave plant. Once a critical resource for survival among hunter and gatherers living in the arid regions of the American Southwest and Mexico, we learn how agave later became embedded in myth, religion, art, and culture. For these indigenous peoples, it was truly a gift from the gods. Portions were filmed in the Verde Valley.

    All Summer Archaeology Film Fest films are free. Doors open at 6:00 pm. Limited seating. No reservations. All films are about one hour.

    • 05 Aug 2016
    • 6:30 PM - 8:00 PM
    • Sedona Public Library, 3250 White Bear Road

    The next film in this summer's free Archaeology Film Fest is Secrets of the Pyramid of Djoser.This film follows Latvian scientists, archaeologists, radar and photogrammetry specialists and others, banded together to create a unique technology for exploring archaeological sites. In the oldest stone building in the world the scientific expedition discovered new underground rooms and a network of gallerie, forcing a reevaluation of previous assumptions about the role and function of pyramids.

    All Summer Archaeology Film Fest films are free. Doors open at 6:00 pm. Limited seating. No reservations. All films are about one hour.

    • 12 Aug 2016
    • 15 Aug 2016
    • Cortez, Colorado
    • 0

    Sorry, but this event is now sold out. You can join the waitlist and we will send you an email when additional spaces become available.

    Join waitlist

    The Center holds a series of excavation field schools near Cortez, Colorado at Mitchell Springs site. The 2016 dates are July 15-18, August 12-15 and August 26-29. 

    The Member cost to attend one session is $185.

    The Non-member cost to attend the first session is $235, which includes a one-year membership. The cost to attend a second is $185, since membership was purchased with the first session. Wait until your membership is processed before registering for additional sessions.

    To reserve your space/spaces you must register and pay your fee at the time of registration. There is a $75 non-refundable cancellation fee.

    No experience is necessary. You will be paired with someone with experience. All materials will be supplied, unless you have your own that you would like to bring. You should be in good health as the activity is mildly strenuous. The weather can be hot, in the high 80's, so appropriate clothing, sunscreen, a hat and plenty of water is a must.

    For additional information, contact Jim Graceffa at dr.jvg@hotmail.com.

    • 12 Aug 2016
    • 6:30 PM - 8:00 PM
    • Archaeology Center, 385 S. Main St., Camp Verde

    The next film in this summer's free Archaeology Film Fest is Secrets of the Pyramid of Djoser.This film follows Latvian scientists, archaeologists, radar and photogrammetry specialists and others, banded together to create a unique technology for exploring archaeological sites. In the oldest stone building in the world the scientific expedition discovered new underground rooms and a network of gallerie, forcing a reevaluation of previous assumptions about the role and function of pyramids.

    All Summer Archaeology Film Fest films are free. Doors open at 6:00 pm. Limited seating. No reservations. All films are about one hour.

    • 19 Aug 2016
    • 6:30 PM - 8:00 PM
    • Sedona Public Library, 3250 White Bear Road

    The next film in this summer's free Archaeology Film Fest is Stone Age Masters: The Magdalenian Masters. This film tells the story of the Magdalenians - ancestors that settled in large areas of Europe between 18,000 and 10,000 years B.C. Their art was amazingly developed. The sculpted bas-relief of the Roc-aux-Sorciers site in southwestern France is proof that a golden age of prehistory did actually exist. This film reveals the Lascaux cave, a showcase that suggests that the Stone Age may well have had its share of “Michelangelos.”

    All Summer Archaeology Film Fest films are free. Doors open at 6:00 pm. Limited seating. No reservations. All films are about one hour.

    • 26 Aug 2016
    • 29 Aug 2016
    • Cortez, Colorado
    • 1

    The Center holds a series of excavation field schools near Cortez, Colorado at Mitchell Springs site. The 2016 dates are July 15-18, August 12-15 and August 26-29. 

    The Member cost to attend one session is $185.

    The Non-member cost to attend this session is $235, which includes a one-year membership. 

    To reserve your space/spaces you must register and pay your fee at the time of registration. There is a $75 non-refundable cancellation fee.

    No experience is necessary. You will be paired with someone with experience. All materials will be supplied, unless you have your own that you would like to bring. You should be in good health as the activity is mildly strenuous. The weather can be hot, in the high 80's, so appropriate clothing, sunscreen, a hat and plenty of water is a must.

    For additional information, contact Jim Graceffa at dr.jvg@hotmail.com.

    • 26 Aug 2016
    • 6:30 PM - 8:00 PM
    • Archaeology Center, 385 S. Main St., Camp Verde

    The next film in this summer's free Archaeology Film Fest is Stone Age Masters: The Magdalenian Masters. This film tells the story of the Magdalenians - ancestors that settled in large areas of Europe between 18,000 and 10,000 years B.C. Their art was amazingly developed. The sculpted bas-relief of the Roc-aux-Sorciers site in southwestern France is proof that a golden age of prehistory did actually exist. This film reveals the Lascaux cave, a showcase that suggests that the Stone Age may well have had its share of “Michelangelos.”

    All Summer Archaeology Film Fest films are free. Doors open at 6:00 pm. Limited seating. No reservations. All films are about one hour.

    • 11 Oct 2016
    • 6:30 PM - 8:00 PM
    • Cliff Castle Casino Hotel, 333 Middle Verde Rd., Camp Verde

    Ancient Woodworking, Animal Use, and Hunting Practices in Southeastern Utah: New Insights from the Study of Early Perishable Collections

    During the 1890s, more than 4000 textiles, baskets, wooden implements, hide and feather artifacts, and other organic materials were excavated by local “cowboy” archaeologists from Basketmaker and Pueblo-period archaeological sites in southeastern Utah. Most of these artifacts were shipped to museums outside of the Southwest, where they remain largely unknown to archaeologists and the public. In 2010, the Cedar Mesa Perishables Project was born to “re-excavate” and document these collections. Our work with these 700 to 2000-year-old collections has uncovered a wide range of well-preserved and often-complete wood, horn, bone, and feather implements related to woodworking, hideworking, animal and bird procurement, farming, personal adornment, and other socioeconomic practices. In this presentation, we will discuss some of what we have learned about the use and manufacture of these perishable technologies and how our work with these collections has broadened our understanding of Basketmaker and ancestral Puebloan societies in ways that the study of more durable artifacts cannot.

    Dr. Laurie Webster is an anthropologist who specializes in the perishable material culture of the American Southwest. She is a visiting scholar in the Department of Anthropology at the University of Arizona and a Research Associate at the American Museum of Natural History and the Crow Canyon Archaeological Center. Six years ago, she founded the Cedar Mesa Perishables Project to document the thousands of perishable artifacts recovered from alcoves in southeastern Utah during the 1890s.

    Chuck LaRue is a wildlife biologist and naturalist who has worked extensively with birds on the Colorado Plateau and other areas of the Southwest for 35 years. He has conducted bird inventories and surveys for Glen Canyon , Grand Canyon, Canyon de Chelly, Hubbell Trading Post, and Black Mesa. He has developed an interest in Ancestral Puebloan technologies and lifeways and has replicated many prehistoric artifacts. He will share examples of these during the presentation.

    This lecture will be at the Cliff Castle Casino Hotel Conference Center, 333 Middle Verde Road.  All lectures begin at 6:30 pm and are free and open to the public.



     

    • 15 Oct 2016
    • 6:00 PM - 10:00 PM
    • Poco Diablo Resort, Sedona
    • 130

    Please plan to attend our International Archaeology Day Benefit Gala. It will again be held at the Sedona Poco Diablo Resort. The 2015 event sold out.

    The event features a Silent Auction and a very short program including a talk by Filmer Kewanyama, an award-winning Hopi artist from Shungopavi, Second Mesa, Arizona, whose work depicts the sacred Hopi way of life. One of Filmer's original oil paintings will be included in the Silent Auction.

    Menu selections will be announced soon. Tickets are $125 ($75 tax deductible) that include a drink ticket and will go on sale on September 1.

    Additional details and ticket purchases can be found on the webpage for the Gala.

    • 17 Oct 2016
    • 9:00 AM
    • 07 Nov 2016
    • 12:00 PM
    • VVAC Learning Center Room
    • 13

      "Pottery Analysis of the Verde Valley"Identification of Prehistoric pottery of North Central Arizona

    Join Dr. Jim Graceffa and staff as they take you through the basics of identification, construction, decoration and terminology of prehistoric pottery. Learn to identify the different Wares and Types of prehistoric pottery found in  the Verde Valley. Become familiar with what types you are seeing in the field. Hands on participation are a big part of this class.

    This course is over four sessions, Oct. 17, 24, 31 and Nov. 7 from 9:00 AM to 12:00 PM and will be held in the Center's Conference Room.  Class will be limited to 14 participants. A Waiting List will be created for those interested when the limit is reached.

    Cost for the 4 sessions of the MEMBERS ONLY class is $80.00 per member and includes the book "Pottery Analysis for the Verde Valley."


    • 10 Nov 2016
    • 6:30 PM - 8:00 PM
    • Cliff Castle Casino Hotel, Camp Verde

    Dr. Laura Tohe (Dine) will present the next lecture in our series during Native American Heritage Month entitled: Rising from Invisibility: Indigenous Arizona Women in Charge of Themselves

    In many Southwestern matrifocal cultures, Indigenous women’s lives are modeled after female heroes and sacred women who exemplify and express courage and kinship values. Among some tribal cultures, rites of passage celebrate female creativity and the transformative nature of women, hence there was not a need for the concept of feminism. Nevertheless, Indigenous women’s lives remain invisible and stereotyped by Hollywood. This talk presents how Indigenous women have contributed in significant ways, not only to their tribal nations, but also to many aspects of contemporary American life.

    Dr. Tohe was born in Fort Defiance, AZ and is Tsenabahinii  (Sleeping Water People clan) and born for the Tódích´íinii (Bitter Water clan). She grew up near the Chuska Mountains on the eastern border of the Navajo Reservation and attended both boarding schools and public schools in Albuquerque. Laura holds a B.A. in psychology from the University of New Mexico and an M.A. and Ph.D. in English from the University of Nebraska where she received both a Regent Fellowship and Minority Fellowships to support her studies. She is now an Assistant Professor in the English Department at Arizona State University.

    • 15 Nov 2016
    • 6:30 PM - 8:00 PM
    • Cliff Castle Casino Hotel, 333 Middle Verde Rd., Camp Verde

    Our Native American Heritage Month Lecture Series presents Carrie Cannon. Plants, Inspiring the People: Reflections on Hualapai  Ethnobotany of the Grand Canyon

    Where lies the cure to diabetes? “Ask the prickly pear, or the mesquite bean pod…maybe they will tell you.” This is the answer you may hear from elder instructors of the Hualapai Ethnobotany Youth Project. The ethnobotanical story of the Hualapai Tribe begins with the plant knowledge the people have inherited from their great grandparents who lived entirely off the land. Hualapai grandchildren live in a completely different modern world. Information presented will share the project examining the crucial role that plant resource acquisition has played in Hualapai culture; knowledge that has been fine tuned and perfected over millennia.

    Carrie Cannon is a member of the Kiowa tribe of Oklahoma and is also of Oglala Lakota descent. She has a B.S. in Wildlife Biology, and an M.S. in Resource Management. She began working for the Hualapai Tribe of Peach Springs, Arizona in 2005 where she began the creation of an intergenerational ethnobotany program for the Hualapai community. She is currently employed as an Ethnobotanist for the Hualapai Department of Cultural Resources. She administers a number of projects promoting the intergenerational teaching of Hualapai ethnobotanical knowledge working towards preservation and revitalization to ensure tribal ethnobotanical knowledge persists as a living practice and tradition.

    All lectures are free and open to the public.

    • 22 Nov 2016
    • 6:30 PM - 8:00 PM
    • Cliff Castle Casino Hotel, Camp Verde

    Our Native American Heritage Month Lecture Series presents Royce Manuel (Akimel O’odham) and Debbie Nez-Manuel (Diné). Himdak doo IIna: A Way of Life. How Societies Shape Culture.

    For tribal groups in Arizona, understanding the connections between physical, social, mental and spiritual identity of the people prior to birth through 102 years old is a way of life. Tribes in Arizona often illustrate their balance between patriarch and matriarch societies through symbolism. Illustrating with the Man in the maze and the Navajo basket designs, Royce Manuel, Auk-Mierl Aw-Thum and Debbie Nez-Manuel, Diné unfold the general understanding of two common designs.

    Royce Manuel (Akimel O’odham) best describes his work through the "Tools of Yesterday" using plant fiber, primitive bows & arrows, knapping stone, and making agave plant cordage. As a tribal and cultural educator and member of the Salt River Pima-Maricopa Indian Community, Royce specializes in the revival and teaching of artistic traditions and indigenous knowledge. Debbie Nez-Manuel (Diné), has a Masters in Social Work, Arizona State University and is experienced in both non-profit and tribal communities. Debbie’s traditional and bi-cultural lifestyles, provides valuable insight and practices in both urban and tribal community settings while preserving, strengthening, and renewing cultural identity.

    All lectures are free and open to the public.

    • 29 Nov 2016
    • 6:30 PM - 8:00 PM
    • Cliff Castle Casino Hotel, Camp Verde

    Our Native American Heritage Month Lecture Series presents Dr. Evangeline Parsons Yazzi. Boarded Up: Social and Historical Interpretations of the American Indian Boarding School Era

    This presentation by Dr. Evangeline Parsons Yazzie will impart a social interpretation of how life among Indian Nations began to change due to the plight American Indian people were forced into in the name of education. American Indians are the only ethnic group in the U.S. who were subjected to forced education by the federal government for generations. Children were taken by force, placed in a boarding school, kept there for several years, and were not allowed to speak their language or practice their culture. Parents were forced to sever all contact with their children while the children were forced into a hostile environment and expected to thrive and learn. The presentation is from an American Indian perspective.

    Dr. Evangeline Parsons Yazzie is a Professor Emerita at Northern Arizona University. She obtained a Masters degree in Bilingual Multicultural Education and a Doctorate in Education.

    This is a free presentation, open to the public.

    • 17 Jan 2017
    • 6:30 PM - 8:30 PM
    • Cliff Castle Casino Hotel, Camp Verde

    More than 235 Hohokam ball courts have been recorded in Arizona, including the Verde Valley. Archaeologists believe these courts were used to play a ritual ballgame that originated in Central America where it was played for over 2,000 years. The Olmec, Maya, Aztec, Zapotec, Hohokam, and other cultures played a ballgame that involved team participation and has been called “the sport of life and death.” This richly illustrated presentation by our Director of Archaeology, Dr. Todd Bostwick, discusses the Mesoamerican ballgame, its ritual and cosmological significance, and the variety of courts, game equipment, and art associated with the game.

    He will present current ideas about Hohokam ball courts and their importance in facilitating trade and resolving social conflicts in prehistoric Arizona. Photographs taken by Dr. Bostwick will be shown of ball courts in Mexico, Guatemala, Honduras, Belize, and Arizona.

    This free talk will follow the Center's annual meeting and is open to the public.