Login
 
 

 

Event Calendar

Upcoming events

    • 17 Jan 2017
    • 6:30 PM - 8:30 PM
    • Cliff Castle Casino Hotel, Camp Verde

    More than 235 Hohokam ball courts have been recorded in Arizona, including the Verde Valley. Archaeologists believe these courts were used to play a ritual ballgame that originated in Central America where it was played for over 2,000 years. The Olmec, Maya, Aztec, Zapotec, Hohokam, and other cultures played a ballgame that involved team participation and has been called “the sport of life and death.” This richly illustrated presentation by our Director of Archaeology, Dr. Todd Bostwick, discusses the Mesoamerican ballgame, its ritual and cosmological significance, and the variety of courts, game equipment, and art associated with the game.

    He will present current ideas about Hohokam ball courts and their importance in facilitating trade and resolving social conflicts in prehistoric Arizona. Photographs taken by Dr. Bostwick will be shown of ball courts in Mexico, Guatemala, Honduras, Belize, and Arizona.

    This free talk will follow the Center's annual meeting and is open to the public.

    This lecture series is open to the public. Admission is free to members. A $5 donation by nonmembers is suggested.

    • 14 Feb 2017
    • 6:30 PM - 8:00 PM
    • Cliff Castle Casino Hotel, 333 Middle Verde Rd., Camp Verde

    Dr. Jaime José Awe is a Belizean archaeologist who specializes in the ancient Maya. He is an Assistant Professor of Anthropology at Northern Arizona University, and the Director of the Belize Valley Archaeological Reconnaissance Project. 

    Dr. Awe's presentation discusses ongoing investigations by the BVAR Project at Xunantunich, Belize and highlights several new discoveries that were made during the recent 2016 field season. Besides a large royal tomb, and caches of eccentric flints, the new finds included two hieroglyphic panels that implicate four Classic period Maya cities. The discoveries also serve to demonstrate that, in spite of being the focus of explorations for more than a century, Xunantunich continues to provide us with intriguing new information on the significant roles played by Belize valley polities in the socio-political stage of the Late Classic Maya lowlands.

    This lecture series is open to the public. Admission is free to members. A $5 donation by nonmembers is suggested. 

    • 18 Mar 2017
    • 10:00 AM - 11:30 AM
    • Camp Verde Town Hall Room 106

    Archaeology Fair Lecture
    This program discusses the 1864 expedition of King S. Woolsey and Governor Goodwin following Indian trails to the Verde Valley with 80 miners. Their objectives were to find a central location for the new capitol of the Arizona Territory, fight Indians, and at the same time prospect the country that they passed through.  The expedition went down the Verde River to the Salt River and White's Mill near Casa Blanca. King S. Woolsey was a pioneer rancher, Indian-fighter, prospector and politician in 19th century Arizona. John Noble Goodwin, an attorney and politician, served as the Governor of Arizona Territory from 1863 to 1866.  He also was a delegate to the United States House of Representatives from the Arizona Territory.

    Ehrhardt has been a major supporter of the Coconino National Forest and Museum of Northern Arizona research projects. Ehrhardt's contributions to research projects such as Sacred Mountain, in the Beaver Creek drainage, and Honanki, northwest of Sedona, have been invaluable. He assisted Pilles and Wilcox as they worked to document the archaeology of previously unexplored corners of the Sedona area. They were working to refine the knowledge of the cultural resources of Perry Mesa. In 2007, Ehrhardt was named the Avocational Archaeologist of the Year by the Governor's Archaeology Advisory Commission during presentations at the Historic Preservation Conference in Prescott, Arizona.

    This lecture is free but donations to help defray costs will be requested.

    • 18 Mar 2017
    • 10:00 AM
    • 19 Mar 2017
    • 4:00 PM
    • Camp Verde Community Center, 395 S. Main St.

    The annual Verde Valley Archaeology Fair is a Signature Event of the Arizona SciTech Festival.  The Fair features archaeology related lectures, films, demonstrations and classes. Visit the Archaeology Fair page for details as they are announced.


    • 18 Mar 2017
    • 12:00 PM - 1:30 PM
    • Camp Verde Town Hall Room 106

    Archaeology Fair Lecture
    Salt has been a valuable trade item throughout human history. Native American salt procurement in the Southwest involved dangerous journeys across sacred landscapes associated with a deity called Salt Woman. This presentation describes the history of a famous salt mine in Camp Verde, Arizona, where prehistoric Sinagua tools used for mining salt were discovered in the 1920s by historic miners deep inside tunnels dug into a thick, fresh-water salt deposit. Numerous photographs are shown of these well-preserved, 700-year old tools to illustrate the story of this unusual discovery.  Comparisons are made with other Native American salt mines in the Southwest.

    Dr. Todd Bostwick has conducted archaeological research in the Southwest for 36 years. He was the Phoenix City Archaeologist for 21 years at Pueblo Grande Museum, and is currently the Director of Archaeology at the Verde Valley Archaeology Center. He has an MA in Anthropology and a PhD in History from Arizona State University (ASU), and taught classes at both ASU and Northern Arizona University for more than seven years. He has been an Arizona Humanities Scholar on several projects, and has published numerous books and articles on Southwest archaeology and history. Dr. Bostwick has received awards from the Arizona Archaeological Society, National Park Service, City of Phoenix, and the Arizona Governor’s Office.

    The lecture is free but a donation to help defray costs will be requested.

    • 18 Mar 2017
    • 2:00 PM - 3:30 PM
    • Camp Verde Town Hall Room 106

    Archaeology Fair Lecture
    Despite being the only universally-recognized building for prostitution from the ancient Roman world, the purpose-built brothel (lupanar) of Pompeii remains a misunderstood structure. Modern research has painted an incomplete picture of the edifice, with nearly all emphasis being assigned to its sexually-explicit aspects while its other details are ignored. This is especially true in regard to its rarely-seen second floor, a segment that has almost no scholastic record of study. Through a careful examination of the remaining physical and archaeological evidence, this talk shall reconstruct the lupanar as an economic enterprise embedded in a larger urban fabric, generating a more comprehensive illustration of this thus-far unique construction.

    Michel "Mike" Zajac is an independent scholar who has taught at Arizona State University and throughout the Maricopa Community College system since 2009. He holds a B.I.S. degree in Art History and Psychology (summa cum laude) and an M.A. in Art History, both from ASU. He conducted his graduate fieldwork at Pompeii, and has worked as a researcher and excavator for six seasons at the Greco-Roman site of Marion / Arsinoe in Cyprus. He is the former Secretary of the Archaeological Institute of America's Central Arizona Society.

    The lecture is free but a donation to help defray costs will be requested.

    • 11 Apr 2017
    • 6:30 PM - 8:00 PM
    • Cliff Castle Casino Hotel, 333 Middle Verde Rd, Camp Verde

    In this presentation, archaeologist Kim Spurr will discuss how prehistoric agriculture in the Southwest is typically equated with corn, beans, and squash. Another important crop was cotton, which provided both food and fibers for weaving. Cotton was cultivated throughout the Southwest, but had limited distribution in central and northern Arizona due to its need for ample water and a long growing season. Recent excavations and genetic studies have expanded our understanding of the role of cotton in prehistoric commerce and society. This presentation will highlight cotton textiles from the VVAC’s Dyck Rockshelter collection, as well as providing a broad background on the uses and cultural significance of cotton in the Southwest.

    Kimberly Spurr is Archaeology Division Director at the Museum of Northern Arizona and Vice-President of the VVAC. For more than 25 years, Kim has worked as a professional archaeologist in the American Southwest and the western U.S. She holds degrees in Anthropology from Colorado College and Northern Arizona University. She is adjunct faculty at Northern Arizona University and spent over a decade training Native American archaeology students in field and lab settings. Her major research interests include pre-ceramic cultures of the Southwest, prehistoric exchange systems, economic development of the historic American West, and the bioarchaeology of prehistoric and historic populations.

    This lecture series is open to the public. Admission is free to members. A $5 donation by nonmembers is suggested.