Login

 
 

 

Event Calendar

Upcoming events

    • 10 Feb 2016
    • 6:30 PM - 8:00 PM
    • Verde Valley Archaeology Center
    • 27
    Learn about the VVAC Capital Campaign Fundraising River Cruise with host Dr. Todd Bostwick, our Director of Archaeology. The tour sails the Rhine, Main and Mosel rivers, seeing fortress towns, castles and Roman ruins. This evening is your opportunity to ask questions about the tour with an AmaWaterways representative. Dr. Bostwick will also present a short program on the Roman ruins in Trier.


    This program is free but reservations are requested due to the limited seating.
    • 16 Feb 2016
    • 6:30 PM - 8:30 PM
    • Cliff Castle Casino Hotel

    Dr. Charles Adams is the Curator of Archaeology for the Arizona State Museum.  He is also Director of the Homolovi Research Program and a professor of archaeology at the University of Arizona.

    During the summer, he directs a field school at Rock Art Ranch for students on the analysis of material culture from surveys and excavations of sites and landscapes occupied from 6000 BCE to 1250 CE. Rock Art Ranch encompassing 5,000 acres between Winslow and Holbrook.  It is a cattle ranch and home to one of the best preserved and most extensive collections of ancient petroglyphs in the world. Images etched into rocks adorn cliff faces, alcoves and overhangs in scenic Chevelon Canyon. Rock Art Ranch has immense archaeological significance, with researchers from the Smithsonian Institution, Heard Museum and other museums and universities visiting regularly.

    Dr. Adams will be presenting his recent findings from his work near Rock Art Ranch.  

    All lecture presentations are free and open to the public. 

    Time: 6:30 PM

    Location: Cliff Castle Casino Hotel, Camp Verde

    • 17 Feb 2016
    • 12:00 PM - 1:30 PM
    • Casa Grande Ruins National Monument

    Throughout history, the ability of a people to survive and thrive has been tied to environmental conditions. The skill to predict the climatic change of the seasons was an essential element in the ability to “control” those conditions. Seasonal calendars thus became the foundation of early cultures: hunting and gathering, planting and harvesting, worshiping and celebrating were activities dictated by specific times of the year. All of these activities have fostered the identity and strength of cultures.

    Presenter Ken Zoll is the Executive Director of the Verde Valley Archaeology Center in Camp Verde. He has conducted extensive fieldwork in cultural astronomy of the Southwest . He is currently working with Arizona State University’s Center for Meteorite Studies on the use of meteorites among ancient Southwest cultures.

    No additional fee, other than normal entrance fee.
    February 17, 2016 - Noon
    Visit  the Casa Grade website for info.

    • 18 Feb 2016
    • 7:00 PM - 8:30 PM
    • Sun City Oro Valley Astronomy Club,

    This is an Arizona Humanities AZ Speaks Program

    Throughout history, the ability of a people to survive and thrive has been tied to environmental conditions. The skill to predict the climatic change of the seasons was an essential element in the ability to “control” those conditions. Seasonal calendars thus became the foundation of early cultures: hunting and gathering, planting and harvesting, worshiping and celebrating were activities dictated by specific times of the year. All of these activities have fostered the identity and strength of cultures.

    Presenter Ken Zoll is the Executive Director of the Verde Valley Archaeology Center in Camp Verde. He is also a volunteer docent at cultural heritage sites in the Coconino National Forest. He has conducted extensive fieldwork in cultural astronomy of the Southwest and is a certified instructor in cultural astronomy with the Arizona Archaeological Society. He is currently working with Arizona State University’s Center for Meteorite Studies on the use of meteorites among ancient Southwest cultures.

    This is a free program open to the public.
    February 18, 2016 - 7:00 PM
    Visit www.scovastronomy.com for info

    • 25 Feb 2016
    • 10:00 AM - 12:00 PM
    • Verde Valley Archaeology Center

    Explore the many ways you can help meet your financial goals and maximize your philanthropic giving through sound and timely gift planning by attending this free seminar in the Center’s conference room.

    Planned Gifts benefit you and your children. Selecting the right planned giving vehicle allows you to reduce your estate and income taxes, maximize the financial and tax benefits of your gift, and make a larger gift than you ever thought possible. Learn how you can actually enhance your own and your family's financial well being while showing your generosity to the nonprofit of your choice. This two-hour seminar will be conducted by a local certified financial planner and an attorney in estate law. 

    February 25, 10 am to Noon and again from 6:30 pm to 8:30 pm

    The seminar is free to members and only $20 for nonmembers.


    • 25 Feb 2016
    • 6:30 PM - 8:30 PM
    • Verde Valley Archaeology Center

    Explore the many ways you can help meet your financial goals and maximize your philanthropic giving through sound and timely gift planning by attending this free seminar in the Center’s conference room.

    Planned Gifts benefit you and your children. Selecting the right planned giving vehicle allows you to reduce your estate and income taxes, maximize the financial and tax benefits of your gift, and make a larger gift than you ever thought possible. Learn how you can actually enhance your own and your family's financial well being while showing your generosity to the nonprofit of your choice. This two-hour seminar will be conducted by a local certified financial planner and an attorney in estate law. 

    February 25, 10 am to Noon and again from 6:30 pm to 8:30 pm

    The seminar is free to members and only $20 for nonmembers.


    • 12 Mar 2016
    • 10:00 AM - 4:00 PM
    • Verde Valley Archaeology Center

    We often hear about amazing family collections that people want to share and learn more about. Therefore, the Center has decided to host an “Antiques Roadshow” style event on March 12 to try and start bridging the gap between public mistrust of archaeological law and families with important archaeological evidence. We have teamed up with Dr. Doug Gann of Archaeology Southwest (Tucson) with our own Dr. Todd Bostwick and Kim Spurr, to present a one-day Roadshow for Verde Valley families to bring in items from their collection to learn more about them and to permit the Center to gain additional knowledge about these past cultures through their artifacts. Unlike the Antique Roadshow, we will not provide a monetary value to any item -- only a value that comes from knowledge and helping to piece together our commonly shared heritage of the Verde Valley. Call Ken Zoll at 928-593-0364 for information.

    March 12 - 10 am to 4 pm
    Free evaluations. Open to the public


    • 15 Mar 2016
    • 6:30 PM - 8:30 PM
    • Cliff Castle Casino Hotel

    William D. Lipe is an archaeologist with expertise in the North American Southwest, archaeological method and theory, and cultural resource management. His Ph.D. (Yale 1966) was based on fieldwork in the Glen Canyon area of southeastern Utah. Subsequent major field projects have included work in the Cedar Mesa region of Utah and the Dolores region of southwestern Colorado. Since the 1980s, he has collaborated with archaeologists at the Crow Canyon Archaeological Center in Cortez, Colorado on studies of Pueblo settlement patterns, community organization, and socio-cultural change in the Northern San Juan region of Colorado and Utah.

    Dr. Lipe will discuss the connection between turkeys and the people of Mesa Verde.

    All lecture presentations are free and open to the public.

    Tuesday, March 15. Time: 6:30 PM

    Location: Cliff Castle Casino Hotel, Camp Verde

    • 18 Mar 2016
    • 5:30 PM - 8:00 PM
    • Javelina Leap Winery, 1565 N Page Springs Rd, Cornville
    • 78

    The Center will host a food, wine and entertainment event to kick-off the "Public Phase" of our Capital Campaign at the Javelina Leap Vineyards on Friday, March 18, starting at 5:30 pm. Limited seating. Tickets are available now.

    Entertainment will be by Jonah Littlesunday. A full-blooded Navajo from Grey Mountain, Arizona, Jonah has been playing the Native American Flute since the age of 14. Jonah gained media attention when he journeyed to Los Angeles to audition for NBC's America's Got Talent Season 10. The experience refocused Jonah on his musical career and since then he has performed across the country.

    • 19 Mar 2016
    • 10:00 AM - 11:30 AM
    • Camp Verde Town Hall, Room 106, 473 S. Main St.
    Verde Valley Archaeology Fair Lecture

    In 1921 the Hopi were told that “church people” petitioned Congress to stop their “pagan” dancing. A group of dancers from Second Mesa were assembled.  After touring the country, a platform was erected on the U.S. Capitol steps where both Houses of Congress assembled with their families to see the Hopi dancers. Congress then passed a Resolution giving the Hopi permission to carry on their dancing “for all time.” They continued to perform, culminating in performances at Carnegie Hall. This program traces their story, including rare film footage that will be featured in an upcoming PBS/BBC television special.

    Presenter Ken Zoll is the Executive Director of the Verde Valley Archaeology Center. The Archaeology Center and the Hopi Tribe jointly applied and received a grant from the National Film Preservation Board to resort and preserve the 1957 films of the Billingsley Hopi Dancers.

    This is a free program open to the public.
    March 19, 2016 - 10:00 AM

    • 19 Mar 2016
    • 10:00 AM
    • 20 Mar 2016
    • 4:00 PM
    • Camp Verde Community Center, 395 S. Main St., Camp Verde

    The Fifth Annual Verde Valley Archaeology Fair will be held in the Camp Verde Community Center, 395 S. Main St, just before the entrance to Ft. Verde State Historic Park. 

    The Fair features archaeology-themed programs and interactive activities for the whole family. Activities created and presented by archaeologists, educators and other specialists will include archaeology methods demonstrations and exhibits on pottery sherd identification, stone tools, excavation tools and techniques, prehistoric astronomy techniques and rock art methods and meanings. There will also be various informational booths including the Arizona Site Steward Program, the Oakcreek Watershed Council, Friends of Verde River Greenway, Friends of the Well, and the Yavapai-Apache Nation.

    Admission to the Fair is FREE. The event runs from 10:00 am to 4:00 pm each day.  The Fair is held in conjunction with the Camp Verde Pecan, Wine and Heritage Festival.

    • 19 Mar 2016
    • 20 Mar 2016
    • 2 sessions
    • Verde Valley Archaeology Center
    A Verde Valley Archaeology Fair Film

    Hidden away in the canyons of a top secret military base on the edge of the Mojave Desert is the largest concentration of rock art in North America. Created over thousands of years by a now vanished culture, it represents the oldest art in California. TALKING STONE explores the remote canyons and mysteries surrounding these amazing images.

    Dr. Alan P. Garfinkel has teamed up with the accomplished film maker Paul Goldsmith ASC to explore and explain this ancient and elegant rock art. Some 35,000 petroglyphs have been formally recorded, but estimates suggest an excess of over 100,000.

    The Coso petroglyphs, consisting of rock carvings depicting animals, abstract symbols and anthropomorphic figures, is located both throughout the higher elevation uplands and the broad volcanic lowland drainages to the south. It is typically found on large outcrops of basalt that form extensive escarpments. These outcrops have developed a dark brown patina - or desert 'varnish' - that when pecked or scratched reveal the lighter heart rock beneath.

    Why was this area, now known as the Coso Range, adorned with such a concentration of strikingly beautiful and highly consistent rock engravings, predominantly those of bighorn sheep? TALKING STONE examines the salient theories associated with this particular rock art, bringing to light the importance of the powerful bighorn sheep, and the animal ceremonialism that existed in this region for the many generations of the Coso people.

    Two showings:
    March 19 at 10:30 AM
    March 20 at 2:30 PM

    Limited seating. Free admission. 

    • 19 Mar 2016
    • 12:00 PM - 1:30 PM
    • Camp Verde Town Hall, Room 106, 473 S. Main St.
    Verde Valley Archaeology Fair Lecture

    Sharonah Fredrick is a lecturer on Mayan, Andean and Southwestern Native American history, anthropology and resistance strategies. She earned her doctorate from Stony Brook University in Hispanic and Latin American literature and has lectured in over 21 countries throughout Latin America, North America, the Middle East and Europe.

    Too often the claim is heard that there is very little ancient history or literature in the United States. Nothing could be further from the truth. Whether it is the Hopi epics of the wanderings of Long Sash and the exploits of the Koshare twins; the Navajo legends that connect the cultures of the Southwest with the great late-Medieval stories of Toltec-Aztec Mexcio; or the adventures of Spanish men and women who deserted Francisco de Coronado’s expedition in protest over Coronado’s treatment of the Native peoples, Arizona and the whole American Southwest are a treasure trove of epic narratives. This lecture stresses the social and moral messages transmitted in these oral and written texts.

    This is a free lecture, at 12:00 pm on Saturday, March 19, 2016.

    This talk is being made available with a grant from the Arizona Humanities AZ Speaks program.

    • 19 Mar 2016
    • 20 Mar 2016
    • 2 sessions
    • Verde Valley Archaeology Center
    A Verde Valley Archaeology Fair Film

    In July of 1919, two cameramen from New York City set out to film Canada’s northern wilderness. They first boarded Canada’s most famous icebreaker, the HMS Nascopie, and headed from Montreal toward the Arctic Circle. Commissioned by the Hudson’s Bay Company, the filmmakers were tasked with capturing life as a fur trader, a snapshot of the Company. By the time they completed filming at the end of December, they’d gathered 75,000 feet of film. The Romance of the Far Fur Country premiered on May 23, 1920, in Winnipeg, before touring Western Canada and additional screenings in Europe.

    By the end of the 1920s, audiences were turning their attention to the talkies, wanting more than just moving pictures. Soon after the Great Depression hit in the 1930s, barely a decade after The Romance of the Far Fur Country was filmed, the footage from the epic Hudson’s Bay Company film disappeared from public view, the canisters of nitrate film stock were packed away by the HBC in an archive in London for safe keeping— but lost to the world.

    In 2011, a community of archivists, academics and filmmakers began a project to bring the 1919 film footage back to Canada, then to return these archival moving images to the communities of origin. Through the sponsorship of the Hudson's Bay Company Archives / Archives of Manitoba, and cooperation of the British Film Institute in London England, the film elements were returned to Winnipeg, Canada. The restoration work began. On the Trail of the Far Fur Country tells the story of this lost film and the journey back to the same communities where it was first shot in 1919.

    Two showings:
    March 19 at 12:30 PM
    March 20 at 12:30 PM

    Limited seating. Free admission.

    • 19 Mar 2016
    • 2:00 PM - 3:30 PM
    • Camp Verde Town Hall, Room 106, 473 S. Main St.
    Verde Valley Archaeology Fair Lecture

    Casey Davis is currently a Secondary Social Studies Curriculum Manager and Designer/Developer for Flip Switch, Inc. He is currently working on his M.A. in American History through American Public University. He is a Road Scholar with Arizona Humanities.

    Annie Oakley is perhaps the best recognized, but little know personalities that came out of the American West. Her life story is one which is enmeshed deeply into the fabric of the American character.  However it was not a cookie cutter life. Oakley defied social norms and cultural mores and expectations of her time while also being an exemplar of American Victorian womanhood.  Oakley’s life provides an insight to a time of transition and upheaval in the nation that is both uniquely American and individual at the same time.

    This is a free lecture, at 2:00 pm on Saturday, March 19, 2016.

    This talk is being made available with a grant from the Arizona Humanities AZ Speaks program.

    • 19 Mar 2016
    • 20 Mar 2016
    • 2 sessions
    • Verde Valley Archaeology Center
    A Verde Valley Archaeology Fair Film

    Chocolate: Pathway to the Gods, explores the 3,000 year-old history of this divine substance through ritual and obsession. From Mayan kings who were buried with, to urban professionals who bathe in it, the film begins in ancient Mesoamerica and journeys throughout time to Europe's finest chocolate houses where chocolate is still revered as one of mankind's highest expressions of decadence and sensuality. This film features discoveries by several prominent Mayan archaeologists that substantiate the sacred role of chocolate in pre-Columbian Mesoamerica. It captures for the first time an ancient, secret method of processing cacao beans still used by women in rural Oaxaca. Additional archaeological and anthropological revelations give the viewer a whole new perspective on chocolate.

    A limited number of the accompanying book will be available in the Gift Shop.

    Two showings:
    March 19 at 2:30 PM
    March 20 at 10:30 AM

    Limited seating. Free admission.


    • 20 Mar 2016
    • 12:00 PM - 1:30 PM
    • Camp Verde Town Hall, Room 106, 473 S. Main St.
    Verde Valley Archaeology Fair Lecture

    Dr. Chrissina Burke’s research seeks to understand the relationship between humans and other members of their ecological communities, by focusing on the impacts prehistoric human hunters had on scavenging carnivores and the methods and behaviors associated with domesticated dog burials. The dog burial project uses curated collections at the Museum of Northern Arizona to identify the size (small-medium-large), age (puppy-subadult-adult) and sex of each dog burial recorded from curated Southwest habitation sites. Identifying the size, age, and sex of the dogs can inform their specific purpose to the human populations. Dogs are predominately thought of as hunting companions prehistorically, but evidence suggests that many of the smaller dogs in the Southwest may have been used as “mousers,” similar to cats in Egypt, or refuse “vacuums,” cleaning up human waste in habitation areas. While this project is in its infancy, the goals associated include identifying which dogs may have been used primarily for hunting or waste management, the significance of their burial in the site given mortuary context, and the development of pet ownership for human societies.

    This is a free lecture, at 12:00 pm on Sunday, March 20, 2016.

    • 20 Mar 2016
    • 2:00 PM - 3:30 PM
    • Camp Verde Town Hall, Room 106, 473 S. Main St.
    Verde Valley Archaeology Fair Lecture

    Dr. Nancy J. Parezo is a Professor of American Indian Studies and Anthropology at the University of Arizona. For over 40 years she has worked with Native Arizona Nations documenting histories and working with artists and oral historians. She has also worked extensively to document how anthropologists have affected Indian cultures through collecting and displaying art at world fairs. She is the co-author of Anthropology Goes to the Fair (with Don Fowler) as well as several works on women anthropologists.

    The men who explored Arizona are legends in the history of the region and of anthropology, but what about the women who accompanied them or explored by themselves? Did you know that Matilda Coxe Stevenson was a member of the first official government survey of Canyon de Chelly or that Emma Mindeleff surveyed ruins in the Verde Valley while Theresa Russell helped her husband locate Hohokam sites? Probably not, for none are listed in “official” histories. Learn about the hidden pioneer archaeologists of the 19th century and honor Arizona’s unsung heroines of science.

    This is a free lecture, at 2:00 pm on Sunday, March 20, 2016.

    This talk is being made available with a grant from the Arizona Humanities AZ Speaks program.

    • 31 Mar 2016
    • 2 sessions
    • Mary D. Fisher Theatre, Sedona

    Two British filmmakers have pieced together this extraordinary story set in the late 1920s when record companies toured America with a recording machine and for the first time captured the raw expression of an emerging culture.

    The filmmakers follow the machine’s trail across the United States to rediscover the families whose music was recorded by it, music that would lead to the development of blues, country, gospel, Hawaiian, Cajun and folk music – without which there would be no rock, pop, R&B or hip hop today. Over three episodes the remarkable lives of these seminal musicians are revealed through previously unseen film footage, unpublished photographs, and exclusive interviews with some of the last living witnesses to that era, when the musical strands of a diverse nation first emerged, sparking a cultural revolution whose reverberations are felt to this day.

    SIFF and the VVAC are honored to present an episode of the PBS 3-part series, AMERICAN EPIC presented by Robert Redford, T Bone Burnett and Jack White. In this special advance screening, the filmmakers travel deep into the Hopi nation and its music, explore the origins of Hawaiian slack-key guitar, discover the hybrid of cultures in Tejano music, and head through bayou country and its Cajun music, ending in Avalon, the the delta blues and its innovator, Mississippi John Hurt.

    British filmmakers, Bernard MacMahon and Allison McGourty, will be in attendance for a Q&A following each showing.

    Patron and Life members of the VVAC will receive free tickets. Tickets will go on sale in March. Visit the Sedona International Film Festival box office online for tickets.

    March 31 at 4:00 pm and again at 7:00 pm

    • 15 Apr 2016
    • 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM
    • Yavapai College - Sedona Campus

    In 1921 the Hopi were told that “church people” petitioned Congress to stop their “pagan” dancing.  A group of Hopi dancers from Second mesa were assembled to demonstrate a version of their dances. After touring the country, a platform was erected on the U.S. Capitol steps where both Houses of Congress assembled with their families to see the Hopi dancers.  Congress then passed a Resolution giving the Hopi permission to carry on their dancing “for all time.”  They continued to perform, culminating in performances at Carnegie Hall.

    This workshop, offered by the Verde Valley Archaeology Center through the Yavapai College Osher Lifelong Learning Institute, traces their story including rare film footage.

    Limited to 24 people. To register go to the OLLI website.

    • 19 Apr 2016
    • 6:30 PM - 8:30 PM
    • Cliff Castle Casino Hotel - Sedona Ballroom

    Excavations on a former rice plantation located in South Carolina Low Country have uncovered ritual niches under the dirt floors of slave cabins. Laws prohibited slaves from gathering in groups, expressing their beliefs openly or any form of ethnic expression that unified them in order to control brewing unrest and revolts. This guest lecture by Dr. Sharon K. Moses of Northern Arizona University, examines how ritual deposits represent resistance and slave efforts to maintain African identities, despite attempts to convert them to Western European beliefs and culture.

    Dr. Moses is a registered professional archaeologist and received her Ph.D from Cornell University where she was an NSF (National Science Foundation) Fellow as well as the recipient of the Cornell SAGE Full Ride fellowship for the Anthropology graduate program. Her dissertation work was based upon on the child burials, rituals and other activities associated with children in the creation of sacred spaces in and outside of household dwellings at Neolithic Çatalhöyük, Turkey. Her work was conducted under the direction of Prof. Nerissa Russell (Cornell University) and under the auspices of Prof. Ian Hodder (Stanford University), Director of the Çatalhöyük Archaeological Project. She is currently an assistant professor of Anthropology/Archaeology at Northern Arizona University.

    All lecture presentations are free and open to the public.

    Time: 6:30 PM

    Location: Cliff Castle Casino Hotel, Camp Verde

    • 22 Apr 2016
    • 1:00 PM - 4:00 PM
    • Yavapai College Sedona Campus

    This program will cover the cultures that have made the Verde Valley their home since 11,000 BC. We will cover the Paleo-Indian (11,500 to 9,000 BC), the Archaic Period (9,000 BC to AD 300), the Sinagua (AD 300 to 1450), and the Yavapai and Apache. Our journey will include a review of some of the more recent excavations in Sedona, Village of Oak Creek, Cottonwood, Rimrock and Camp Verde.

    This workshop is offered by the Verde Valley Archaeology Center through the Yavapai College Osher Lifelong Learning Institute. Class size limited to 24 people. 

    To register go to the OLLI website.

    • 14 May 2016
    • 1:00 PM - 4:00 PM
    • Verde Valley Archaeology Center
    • 20

    This Members-Only program will cover the cultures that have made the Verde Valley their home since 11,000 BC. We will cover the Paleo-Indian (11,500 to 9,000 BC), the Archaic Period (9,000 BC to AD 300), the Sinagua (AD 300 to 1450), and the Yavapai and Apache. Our journey will include a review of some of the more recent excavations in Sedona, Village of Oak Creek, Cottonwood, Rimrock and Camp Verde.

    This workshop is offered only to Center members. Class size limited to 24 people.  A close-up of some of the artifacts in the Center's collection will be included.

    Class fee covers hand-out materials.

    • 15 Jul 2016
    • 18 Jul 2016
    • Cortez, Colorado
    • 8

    The Center holds a series of excavation field schools near Cortez, Colorado at Mitchell Springs site. The 2016 dates are July 15-18, August 12-15 and August 26-29. 

    The Member cost to attend one session is $185.

    Non-members can register beginning March 1. The Non-member cost to attend the first session is $235, which includes a one-year membership. The cost to attend a second or third session is $185, since membership was purchased with the first session. Wait until your membership is processed before registering for additional sessions.

    To reserve your space/spaces you must register and pay your fee at the time of registration. There is a $75 non-refundable cancellation fee.

    No experience is necessary. You will be paired with someone with experience. All materials will be supplied, unless you have your own that you would like to bring. You should be in good health as the activity is mildly strenuous. The weather can be hot, in the high 80's, so appropriate clothing, sunscreen, a hat and plenty of water is a must.

    For additional information, contact Jim Graceffa at dr.jvg@hotmail.com.

    • 19 Jul 2016
    • 6:30 PM - 8:30 PM
    • Cliff Castle Casino Hotel

    As editor of the third edition of Fran Kosik’s classic travel book, "A Complete Motoring Guide to the Navajo and Hopi Nations," Jim Turner retraced her routes in January 2013, updating information on dozens of intriguing Native American trading posts, prehistoric ruins, museums, and natural wonders. Using the pictures taken on that trip, this presentation creates a visual travelogue of this vast beautiful and culturally unique domain.

    Before retiring from the Arizona Historical Society, Jim Turner worked with more than seventy museums in every corner of the state. He wrote the pictorial history book, Arizona: Celebration of the Grand Canyon State, is a part-time editor for Rio Nuevo Publishers, and writes articles for magazines and newspapers. Turner moved to Tucson in 1951, earned a master’s degree in U.S. history from the University of Arizona, and has been researching, writing, and teaching Arizona history for almost forty years.

    This is a free talk, open to the public.

    Cliff Castle Casino Hotel - July 19 - 6:30 pm


    • 12 Aug 2016
    • 15 Aug 2016
    • Cortez, Colorado
    • 5

    The Center holds a series of excavation field schools near Cortez, Colorado at Mitchell Springs site. The 2016 dates are July 15-18, August 12-15 and August 26-29. 

    The Member cost to attend one session is $185.

    Non-members can register beginning March 1. The Non-member cost to attend the first session is $235, which includes a one-year membership. The cost to attend a second or third session is $185, since membership was purchased with the first session. Wait until your membership is processed before registering for additional sessions.

    To reserve your space/spaces you must register and pay your fee at the time of registration. There is a $75 non-refundable cancellation fee.

    No experience is necessary. You will be paired with someone with experience. All materials will be supplied, unless you have your own that you would like to bring. You should be in good health as the activity is mildly strenuous. The weather can be hot, in the high 80's, so appropriate clothing, sunscreen, a hat and plenty of water is a must.

    For additional information, contact Jim Graceffa at dr.jvg@hotmail.com.

    • 26 Aug 2016
    • 29 Aug 2016
    • Cortez, Colorado
    • 10

    The Center holds a series of excavation field schools near Cortez, Colorado at Mitchell Springs site. The 2016 dates are July 15-18, August 12-15 and August 26-29. 

    The Member cost to attend one session is $185.

    Non-members can register beginning March 1. The Non-member cost to attend the first session is $235, which includes a one-year membership. The cost to attend a second or third session is $185, since membership was purchased with the first session. Wait until your membership is processed before registering for additional sessions.

    To reserve your space/spaces you must register and pay your fee at the time of registration. There is a $75 non-refundable cancellation fee.

    No experience is necessary. You will be paired with someone with experience. All materials will be supplied, unless you have your own that you would like to bring. You should be in good health as the activity is mildly strenuous. The weather can be hot, in the high 80's, so appropriate clothing, sunscreen, a hat and plenty of water is a must.

    For additional information, contact Jim Graceffa at dr.jvg@hotmail.com.